Is It True That Liposuction Can Improve Your Health?

Is It True That Liposuction Can Improve Your Health?

Most Americans these days know that being overweight isn’t good for you. Carrying too much fat on your body is hard on your joints, bad for your heart, and makes it difficult to exercise. Being overweight can also lead to a host of other problems such as diabetes, or exacerbate existing ones such as sexual dysfunction.

Because of all of these negative effects of excess weight, the medical community routinely stresses things such as eating a balanced diet and getting enough physical activity. These lifestyle changes can help many people shed some pounds and get back into a healthy weight for their height.

The downside, though, is that such changes are hard to make. They frequently require sacrifices such as skipping dessert, second helpings, or avoiding certain foods altogether, and can require us to go out of comfort zone to learn to play a sport or wake up early to go running. In addition, the hectic pace of modern life can make it difficult to carve out the time to hit the gym or have something other than take-out for dinner. Finally, the results from such lifestyle changes are gradual, taking months or even years of hard work before the person reaches his or her target weight.

All of these problems with traditional methods of weight loss lead many people to turn to alternative solutions such as liposuction. Liposuction is a cosmetic procedure specifically designed to instantly remove fat from the body without recourse to dieting or additional exercise. During the procedure, the surgeon uses special hollow tubes called cannulas to break up and vacuum out unwanted fat deposits from the patient’s body. The procedure only takes an hour or two, is usually an outpatient procedure, and doesn’t require a very long or intensive recovery period.

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All of these advantages combine to make liposuction appealing to a large number of people, but unfortunately, there is a catch. Liposuction is billed as a cosmetic procedure for a reason: it cannot typically take more than ten pounds of fat at a time, and usually only from one or two specific areas of the body. This means that if a person is fifty pounds overweight, they’ll still be a long way from their goal, even after liposuction. In addition, whichever body part they had to procedure performed on may look unnaturally slim in comparison.

Additionally, liposuction only removes fat; it cannot convey all of the benefits of a healthy lifestyle. Liposuction may make you thinner, but it will not build muscle and give you good cardiovascular exercise, nor can it make up for the vitamin deficiencies of an unhealthy diet. In short, liposuction works best the way it was designed-as a cosmetic, rather than a medical, procedure.